Things to know about the year of the Rooster



The numbers 5, 7, and 8 are considered especially lucky for those born in the year of the Rooster while gold and yellow are considered their lucky colors.

 

January 28th marks the first day of the Chinese lunar calendar in 2017. New Year’s Day in China marks the completion of a year of hard work. Chinese New Year, or the Spring Festival as it’s sometimes known, is by far the most important and auspicious of all festivals in the country, and a time for families nationwide to come together and look forward to the upcoming year in hopes of good health, wealth, luck, and happiness.

 

Each year in the Chinese calendar is related to an animal sign according to the twelve-year cycle, and 2017 is the year of the Rooster. The Rooster is the tenth in the Chinese zodiac—each animal in the Chinese zodiac has its own unique significance.

 

Those born in the year of the Rooster (1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, and 2017) are said to be hardworking, tenacious, active, and daring. “Roosters” are, additionally, frank and honest. Known for speaking their minds, they aren’t ones to shy away from attention either. People born in the year of the Rooster are usually very creative, making fantastic entertainers and artists.

 

The numbers 5, 7, and 8 are considered especially lucky for those born in the year of the Rooster while gold and yellow are considered their lucky colors. Roosters should, however, avoid the numbers 1, 3, and 9, and the color red as these are considered unlucky for them.

 

Famous celebrities born in the year of the Rooster include Matt Damon, Natalie Portman, Roger Federer, Matthew McConaughey, Jennifer Aniston, and Elton John.

 

While each animal sign in the Chinese zodiac has its own unique meaning, festivities leading up to, on, and immediately after Spring Festival are much the same every year, regardless of the zodiac. It is a time for families across China to celebrate the year that has just gone by, and usher in the new one with family members and loved ones.

 




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You may also enjoy our interview peering into the life of Uncle Ye, a local Guilin resident, as he discusses the Spring Festival now versus 30 years ago.

 

What is your Chinese Zodiac? Share with us here or on Twitter @studycli.

Live: Above China's Li River

Just after sunrise in southern China, staff photographer Josh Haner is flying a drone over the Li River and the dramatic karst landscape of the Guilin National Park.

Posted by The New York Times on Thursday, June 23, 2016

The New York Times Goes to Guilin

At CLI we’ve always known that Guilin is beautiful and we’ve been on a mission to share the beauty since our founding in 2009. So it was a welcomed surprise when we learned that The New York Times sent staff photographer, Josh Haner, to capture some of Guilin, China’s beauty. Enjoy the view. We hope it inspires you to study Mandarin with CLI in Guilin!

 

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CLI Online Student Wins USA Memory Championship

In addition to winning the USA Memory Championship, CLI Online student, Alex Mullen just set a new World Record in Speed Cards (memorizing the order of one shuffled deck of 52 playing cards as fast as possible). He completed this feat in a mere 18.65 seconds!! What’s more? Alex also won the 2015 World Memory Championship.

Alex has a passion for teaching other the techniques he uses in memory sport competition. Dive into his website and start applying the methods of a World Champion to your language learning journey. As a sample, below we’ve included Alex’s 20 Words Challenge.

 

 

Watch Alex move through a shuffled deck of cards while setting a World Record speed that would intimidate Johnny 5:

 



 

And here’s the moment Alex Mullen was announced USA Memory Champion:

 

Be sure to subscribe to Alex’s YouTube channel. You can also like him on Facebook at Mullen Memory and follow him on Twitter.

 

We hope to study Mandarin in China together some day soon. Don’t forget to follow CLI on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

 

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